Radio Evangelist

Thoughts of a Evangelist for Radio in all its forms

Archive for the ‘Sales’ Category

Happy 2010!

Posted by Steve on January 4, 2010

Phil Bernstein is a blogger in Portland, Oregon. He’s also an account manager with Portland’s Clear Channel radio stations. And he writes about advertising. He’s on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook, too.

Writing about marketing so that his customers can see his thinking differentiates him from virtually every other radio sales person out there.

This is the kind of person that is the future of radio – forward thinking and ready to tackle the marketing of his customers businesses with some marketing of himself. Hats off to Phil!

http://philbernstein.wordpress.com/

Posted in Advertising, Radio, Sales, Social Media | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

Ratings, Radio, Sales – The Debate Goes On

Posted by Steve on July 30, 2009

Chuck Francis, VP New Media at RemergeMedia.com, wrote a well-received article in Radio Business Report recently called “A New Day for Radio.”

Chuck makes the valid point that, in truth, ratings don’t matter, except to “…those that provide ratings.” However, this common-sense statement misses the mark. Yes, it’s not the ratings that matter to the listener or the advertiser. It’s the thing that the ratings represent.

For example, Chuck says:

In the years I spent as a Program Director I cannot recall one single instance where a listener came up to me at an event or a remote and said: “the reason I listen to your station is because your station the number one station.” In fact, even if your station is 13th in the market – I’d argue you’re number one in the minds of the people that listen to you regularly.

One of the reasons that a listener is loyal to a station is because of its reputation among her peers. The listener doesn’t look at the ratings and make a rational decision about whether or not to listen to a station because it’s #1 in one category or another, but she does decide whether to listen partially based on her peer group’s relationship to the station. The ratings are a surrogate for this – they tell us roughly how many and what kind of people are listening to each station. They tell us about the listeners’ peer groups.

On the advertiser side, the ratings are a surrogate for a true measure of results. In the absence of a way to directly measure the ability of a station to deliver results for a specific product, the ratings system was developed in an attempt to predict what will happen if you run a spot on a station.

Those stations who achieve success without ratings have found other ways to measure their reputation with their audience and to predict the results their advertisers will have when they run a spot on the station. However, I suspect that these substitutes for ratings remain surrogates of a direct measurement of reputation or results.

TRA, a research firm in New York, is developing a very interesting way to measure results in TV advertising… a methodology which could well be transferred to radio and other media. Instead of measuring how many people are viewing a particular program, TRA measures how many people actually were exposed to a specific ad and how many of those people actually purchased the product being advertised. This is similar in many ways to the work that was done on Arbitron and Nielsen’s suspended Project Apollo, but TRA is processing millions of households’ viewing data and matching it up against their purchasing data. As this platform matures and is able to capture not only TV viewing but also other forms of media, we will move away from the surrogacy of ratings and towards the direct measurement of the results of radio campaigns.

Of course, it is not likely that this direct measurement of results will be applicable for all advertisers, particularly local retailers. As data is developed inferences will be possible that are much more precise than today’s rating system. TRA could syndicate their data in such a way as to provide local decision-makers tools to determine which media selections are best for their businesses.

Direct response radio marketers are measuring this today, for their clients. One particularly sophisticated firm, Strategic Media, has literally written the book on the subject. Through extensive testing and results measurement, they have built very detailed databases of the stations and creative execution that works best for their clients. Perhaps local radio can learn from this and develop similar data for their advertisers to use.

Please share your views on this subject by commenting on this article.

Posted in Advertising, Media Research, Radio, Sales | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Streaming Audio ROI Spreadsheet

Posted by Steve on March 26, 2009

A while back, I wrote a spreadsheet for some simple calculations of the return on investment for streaming audio – like a radio station.

I have made some changes to the spreadsheet to accommodate the new negotiated SoundExchange fees for terrestrial broadcasters who stream.

Here’s a link – click on the picture and then you should be able to edit the cells in yellow to see the results of different audience size, spot counts and so on.

New Streaming Costs Calculator - Online Spreadsheets - EditGrid.jpg

It’s a work in progress – tell me what you think!

Posted in Advertising, Radio, Sales, streaming | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

Using a Macintosh in a Radio Station

Posted by Steve on March 21, 2009

Chris “Doc” Tarr, Director of Engineering for Entercom in Milwaukee and Madison, WI, wrote an article for RBR today about using Macs in radio stations.

As a business technology consultant for radio stations, I strongly endorse Chris’s statement.

The Mac is a terrific computer for a radio station. It is simple for even the most technophobic account exec to use and because it comes pre-installed with a ton of useful software, there’s a lot you can do with it out of the box.

For example, with the extremely powerful (and included as part of the OS!) iMovie video editing software, even a neophyte can produce compelling video presentations for your sales department or your website. GarageBand, the Mac’s audio editing system, provides many of the features of a much more sophisticated package like ProTools. Thousands of bands have produced professional recordings using GarageBand, right on the Mac. It even has features for creating podcasts – including building the RSS feeds and so on. Very powerful stuff.

For an extra $79, you can get Apple’s iWork, a suite of three applications that include a word processor (Pages), spreadsheet (Numbers) and presentation program (Keynote). In many ways, these applications are even more powerful than MS Office – and they are certainly easier to use. There’s no doubt that Keynote blows away Powerpoint as a presentation tool. Plus – you can create your presentation in Keynote and then export a perfectly compatible Powerpoint version for your less capable colleagues.

Plus, with the free OpenOffice package for OSX, you can have the complete functionality of Microsoft Office on the Mac without the cost!

I have run a virtual machine on my Mac with copies of Tapscan, Maximi$er, PD Advantage, AudioVAULT and various music scheduling packages – and they worked without a hitch. Of course, the vendors get a little “hinky” when you run on unapproved hardware, but with the right relationship with these folks, you can get them to understand.

Imagine being able to create a Tapscan report and then use it seamlessly in a powerful Mac-based presentation package to create a compelling story for a prospect. Of course, as these applications go more to the web (as Max and Tapscan are starting to now), you will be using the web browser and not a built-in application; but the principle still applies. Even more so, because the Mac will let you dress up those dull-looking web reports with some truly persuasive graphic elements – in a snap.

Back in the day, before Maximi$er, I used a Mac to suck in AID runs (remember those?) and automagically transpose them into compelling graphical presentations for my sales team. Even 20 years ago, it was a very useful tool in a radio station.

Another advantage to using a Mac on the business side of a radio station is, quite frankly, the “cool factor.” Many radio station clients are Mac users themselves – ad agencies in particular have been one of the strongest vertical markets for Macintosh for decades. If you walk into a presentation to a group including a creative director, media director and account manager and you plug in your Mac for a Keynote presentation, you will gain immediate “inside” cred. It might be that extra edge that gets you the deal.

Today, the Mac will give you an edge over the competition.

Want to know more? Please leave a comment here or email me: steve dot burgess at agencytechnet dot com.

Posted in Advertising, Macintosh, Radio, Sales, Software | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Monetizing Technology

Posted by Steve on February 23, 2009

Alan Mason, a consultant to the radio industry and partner in the GoodRatings consultancy, made an interesting comment in an article today:

Take Twitter on the other hand. It’s jumped from nothing to more than five million active consumers in a short period of time. Raise your hand if your station as more than five million people in the cume.
But it’s not about Twitter, it’s about why consumers use it and how it will help you engage your consumers. That’s the important part, the level of relationship you have with your listener us where the money is, not with the technology itself.
If you want to monitize technology you need to get into the technology business. In radio, it’s still about how many people listen, and how passionate they are about you, not about whether you twitter or not.

The technological tools that are available today are not going to make you money unless you find a way to tie them to your core business – radio. For example, you’re not going to be able to monetize your twitter feed; but, you could use it to drive listeners to your advertisers by using tiny urls and measure the click-through response. Just an idea.


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